david@haivri.com
David Ha'ivri Services

What is Purim?

Purim is a meaningful celebration for the Jewish people, when we gather to remember the events of the Mordechai and Esther story at Shushan HaBira in Persia many years ago. It was after the destruction of the first Temple that the Jewish people spread out in the diaspora throughout the kingdom of the Achashverosh, who ruled over 127 provinces from India to Ethiopia. His evil antisemitic minister, Haman, plotted to wipe out the entire Jewish people. In the book of Esther, we read of the miraculous chain of events and the heroism of Mordechai and Esther, who put aside their own personal safety and concerns and acted to overturn the terrible decree. Our great sages, the rabbis of the Talmud, determined that these events would be marked on the Jewish calendar as a holiday to celebrate the salvation of the Jewish people throughout the ages. Halacha, the code of Jewish law by which we learn to observe the details of the Mitzvot, requirements of our faith, lists four deeds that the holiday mandates for each Jewish individual on Purim. The four Mitzvot are: Megillah, Mishloach Manot, Matanot L’Evyonim and a Festive Meal. Megillah is the book of Esther, written on a scroll of parchment which is read twice, first after the evening prayers and then again after the morning prayers on the day of Purim. Mishloach Manot means sending food to two friends, and Matanot L’Evyonim is giving charity to two needy people. After we have fulfilled these three Mitzvot, we can sit down with our family and friends and rejoice in the fourth Mitzvah, which is a festive meal in honor of the day.

About the Author
I believe that the Jewish people are realizing their destiny though Zionism, the gathering of the people from the four corners of the globe and building a country and unique society. In my eyes, these investments lead to the higher goal of becoming a “light unto the nations.” I believe that peace can be achieved in the Middle East through mutual respect and appreciation that does not require Israel relinquishing any part of its land or compromising its security.

Leave a Reply

*

Get David's Newsletter
We respect your privacy.